Casablanca Valley, Chile (Part 2 of 3: Bodegas RE)

Picking up from Part 1, we departed from Kingston and headed over to Bodegas RE, (use the google page translate feature to see the page in english or use your espanol!), which is a short but beautiful drive. All on the tour were feeling quite happy at this point. We entered the grounds and were immediately led into their gift shop area, replete with many vintage display items, including a cash register, a treadle sewing machine and floors made of railroad ties. Outdoors they had a grape press and some other non-functional equipment, just for show. Why should all of this matter? It's all part of their philosophy: revelation, recreation and revolution. They take the old ways and make them new again. As a vintage fan, I love everything about it.

 money, money, money...

money, money, money...

Palm trees in the vineyard!

We were shortly led to the vineyard, where we were given an overview of this young winery, established in 2007 by Pablo Morande, who comes from a lineage of winemaking. Our tour guide was kind enough to encourage the customary tasting of the grapes, as they did at Kingston, and similarly, they were sweetened to ripeness, the harvest impending, if not happening at the time were there (mid-March). Our time in the vineyard had to remain brief as the sun was sweltering. Ironic as our guide referenced the cool climate of Casablanca. In that moment, we had to take her word for it.

We adjourned to a cool indoor area next, called the Balsameria. Aged balsamic vinegar. In oak. That was neat. We got to smell the different varieties. There are none for sample or purchase though. No. They are serious about this thing called aging and it will not be ready for 10-20 years. Very impressive! I plan to return for the BV, because if their wine is any testament, it will be high quality.  

 Fruit liqueurs aging in vintage bottles.

Fruit liqueurs aging in vintage bottles.

At last we came to the cellar, where oak and concrete eggs are both being utilized.  Bodegas RE is also considered a boutique winery, though their production seems larger than Kingston. They also have many different styles as they are doing some intriguing things with the wine, combining not only grapes, but re-naming their wines as such, for example, the Chardonnoir, which is you guessed it: Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. No skin contact, so it's not pink. Fun, right? Also delicious.      

We tasted a few different things, white, red and a tinge of pink. My partner and I really liked the 2009  Vigno by Vina Roja. It is 100% Carignan, which is not usually my bag, but this wine is exquisite. We ended up purchasing a bottle for us to keep and another for a wedding gift for our friends. We bought some other bottles to take back and share with our fellow travelers in Santiago, including the "Syranoir" (as it sounds, Syrah and Pinot Noir).  Bodegas RE is seriously worth visiting and spending time at. The wine is pro and they have a cool concept. You will be grateful that you did. As North Americans, we have such limited access to all of the amazing small production wine from Chile. These tours are a means to cultivating your knowledge and broadening your wine purchases. The tour is worth it's weight in....wine. I had to. Cheers!

 I mean, c'mon...

I mean, c'mon...

 You might think that is wine, but it is actually balsamic gettin' its age on!

You might think that is wine, but it is actually balsamic gettin' its age on!

After the Balsameria we did actually see a room with some other fruit liqueurs that they are trying out. They have cherries or lemon rind. Apparently the technique to create these alcoholic beverages is also quite old, and many people make it home, offering it to guests, just a tiny portion, as it is rather potent (read boozy).  We did not taste, which was fine enough for me, as I had one thing on the brain. My favorite snack.

To the left is the Cabergnan which is....pop quiz.......70% Cabernet Sauvignon and 30% Carignan. You will also note that the grapes are from Maule Valley, thus not all of the wine at Bodegas RE is made from grapes sourced from Casablanca Valley. 

 And then we tasted!

And then we tasted!

We really enjoyed the wine here. They also had a spread of edibles: cheese, breads with their olive oil (sold in gift shop) for dipping, olives, veggie chips (also sold in the gift shop). The noshing was needed at that point in the day. It was all vegetarian, BTW.